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The Waterton Group offers a customized GRE experience reserved for the most driven and ambitious. Our students typically go on to top graduate schools after studying with Waterton.

Most Dallas-area GRE prep courses are offered in classroom-based settings. This approach is slow and designed to “overview” the material. The Waterton Group offers a much more aggressive approach. Our in-home tutoring platform has been proven to yield superior results on the GRE. Waterton instructors work on an individual basis with each student so you won’t waste time on familiar material.

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Your GRE Scores Matter

Without proper study, students typically find it challenging to score in the 90%+ of test takers. The Waterton Group is able to help. For those unfamiliar with the test, the GRE is a computer based test designed to test high level math and verbal skills for all graduate school applicants. The essence of this test is to gauge an applicant’s knowledge by testing quantitative, verbal, and writing skills. GRE test scores are valid for five years after your testing year (July 1–June 30). Currently, scores earned from July 2010 to the present are available.


Your GRE Scores Matter

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Know the Test

Verbal Reasoning

The computer-based Verbal Reasoning section assesses your reading comprehension and your ability to analyze information obtained from it, as well as measures your use of vocabulary. You will have 30 minutes to answer 20 multiple-choice questions spanned across three different types: Reading Comprehension, Text Completion, and Sentence Equivalence. A Verbal Reasoning score is reported on a scale of 130-170, in 1-point increments. As of 2011, the Verbal Reasoning section has undergone several modifications, such as the elimination of the Antonyms and Analogies sections, a reduced emphasis on vocabulary, the replacement of Sentence Completion with Text Completion, and revised reading questions to allow for more than one response.

Quantitative Reasoning

The computer-based Quantitative Reasoning section tests basic high school level mathematics. You will have 35 minutes to answer 20 multiple-choice questions spanned across four different problem types: Arithmetic, Algebra, Geometry, and Data Analysis. A Quantitative Reasoning score is reported on a scale of 130–170, in 1-point increments. As of 2011, the Quantitative Reasoning section has undergone several modifications, such as the addition of numeric entry questions, which provide no answers from which to choose, and revised questions to allow for more than one response.

Analytical Writing

The Analytical Writing section is compromised of two separately timed 30-minute essays: "Analyze an Issue" and "Analyze an Argument." Within the Issue task, you are asked to analyze a provided statement on a complex matter, take a position on the topic, and develop a response that discusses the extent to which you agree or disagree with the prompt. The Argument task, by contrast, asks you to dissect the logic used within the presented statement. Essays are composed on a computer using a specifically designed word processor, which only allows for typographical input and does not check for errors in spelling, punctuation, or grammar. Each essay on the Analytical Writing section is graded on a scale of 0-6, in half-point increments, and scored by two readers. If the two scores are within one point of each other, they are averaged for a final score; however, a difference by more than one point will involve a third reader to grade the essay.



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